You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘human rights’ tag.

In a break from tradition, today I just want to post about food. Because it’s quarter to twelve in London and I’m hungry.

Not starving. Just hungry.

I can’t stand it when middle class and even relatively well-off working class people in developed Western countries dash panting into the office at 10 o’clock in the morning and lament “I’m starving.” You’re not starving. You’ve woken up at a leisurely hour, left yourself no time to have a decent breakfast at home, rushed out of the house and needlessly spent £2.65 on a questionably sourced caffeine fix from Starbucks, and arrived at work in a sweat only to need to rush back out, this time to the on-campus Starbucks to needlessly spend more money on an overpriced late breakfast.

Bulk up.

Children in Palestine desperately waiting for humanitarian aid to sustain themselves, millions in some of the most deprived and war-ravaged nations in Africa, the homeless even in the rich West who rely on spare change from passers by for their next meal – they’re the ones who are starving. People on self-imposed hunger strikes protesting political injustice and persecution and abuses of human rights. They’re starving.

So, I am hungry.

I came across an interesting blog today. I can’t link to it because they probably wouldn’t like what I’m going to say.

The blog is about a university student’s daily meals – where and what they eat and how much they pay for it. I happened to come across yesterday’s entry and, fascinated, went back to look at the previous day’s, and then the day’s before that. Every day seemed to be composed of a breakfast of a buttered breadroll and something to drink, a lunch of an energy drink, chips, and donuts, and a dinner of more energy drink and occasionally a packaged meal. Wow, I kept thinking, doesn’t this person ever make an effort to eat properly (and save money at the same time)?

Firstly, breakfast is the most important meal of the day. It’s usually the first food you eat after having ‘fasted’ for 8-12 hours overnight and it restores your blood sugar levels and sustains you throughout the morning. The morning hours (8-11am) are the hours when attention and other cognitive processes have the greatest potential, meaning if you’ve had a good breakfast, you’ll be much more likely to work productively. Lunch doesn’t have to be a big effort. If more people kicked their own arses to cook a meal for dinner in the evenings, the leftovers would do just fine for the next day’s lunch. You can cook a meal easily in an hour or so, providing you pick up some simple groceries from the shop.

I always cook, whether I’m living alone or not. Because I like it. I like buying supplies and using them to create different meals and rising to the challenge of achieving it all cheaply and quickly, because I’m a student. I find it bizarre when I have people round to eat or when people ask me in the office and they seem to think it’s such a huge effort to actually go to the shop and buy groceries and come home and cook a meal. That seems like a lot of effort, why don’t you just buy it? they ask. I couldn’t imagine buying three meals a day, seven days a week. I’d be out of pocket but more than that I’d get sick. Really. Many people seem to think it’s healthy and acceptable to consume bottled fruit juices, packaged TV dinners, boxed sandwiches. I get sick if I eat these more than once in a while. I get purple circles under my eyes and I start to feel permanently tired and I get headaches. It’s bad for you, even though it looks healthy. Please don’t eat it.

And you know, much more than being out of pocket and sick, I won’t eat commercially made food because it makes me feel like a slave to irresponsible consumerism. Today we live in a world where many people can’t imagine how they would survive without the convenience of being able to buy a sandwich or a roast dinner from the supermarket. People who don’t have the slightest idea how to make soup, even the simplest kind. People who actually hate cooking meals for themselves, because they think it’s tedious or boring or a waste of time.

Bulk up!

I don’t want to be one of them. I don’t care if the research is coming out of my ears or if I’m up to my neck in teaching. I will spend an hour to cook for myself and I will enjoy it.

Now I will have lunch.

UN permanent representatives yesterday received an address by Assange in relation to human rights and the legitimacy of diplomatic asylum. The address came not long after both Assange and the wider WikiLeaks community were declared enemies of the state by the US, putting them on the same list as well-known ‘terrorist’ organisations like Al-Qaeda.

‘It is time for the US to cease its persecution of WikiLeaks’

So it’s a huge shame for that so-called ‘cradle of democracy’ that any American military personnel serving in the armed forces who should decide to express solidarity with the WikiLeaks movement by helping classified information be published in the public domain will now be at risk of indefinite detainment, charge, torture, and capital punishment for treason.

The same as Bradley Manning.

And it is amazing to watch the hundreds of thousands of ordinary people around the world rallying (for almost 2 years) for freedom for Assange, freedom for WikiLeaks, and freedom for all individuals in the pursuit of progressive change who act as their sources, and it is amazing to see how their screams continue to fall on deaf ears:

Protest in cyberspace

Protest in Melbourne

Protest in London

Protest in New York

Protest in Sao Paulo, Sydney, Amsterdam, and Lima

It’s amazing to think about the intellectually narrow, never-changing politics that continue to shape the way government authorities bind themselves rigidly to the ‘law’, even when the law is morally wrong. And at other times, it’s equally amazing how they ignore the law, even when the law is morally right.

It’s time to free not only Assange from his political persecution of over 600 days, but the truth from its forsaken grave deep in the classified vaults of world governments.

To think that in this so-called era of enlightenment, human rights abuses of such formidable magnitude can be pushed through corrupt and misinformed political systems so audaciously and contradictory to both social and scientific opposition at a global scale – I’ll be damned.
http://www.aksam.com.tr/kurtaj-yasagi-fakir-kadini-oldurur–119412h.html

Friend of WikiLeaks

February 2020
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
242526272829  

Categories

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 96 other followers

The Final Countdown

Submission of PhD ThesisMay 1st, 2013
The big day is here. Joy to the world!